The Powerhouse of “Powerless”: Who Is Crimson Fox?

With DC and Marvel Comics laying claim to over a dozen television shows currently on the air, the new NBC comedy Powerless does something unique to stand out from the pack. It does this by focusing not on superheroes, but rather on the everyday joes who just happen to live and work in a world where a plethora of super-powered beings don flashy costumes to either wreak havoc or save the day – or sometimes both.

As it takes place in the DC Universe (albeit, a much more brighter one than the film DCU of Batman v Superman and Suicide Squad and more lighthearted than the tv DCU found in the CW’s quartet of Arrow-verse shows) there have been multiple references to many of DC’s superhero royalty. We’re talking the big guns like Batman, Aquaman, Flash and the one character than has been significantly featured more than any other — Crimson Fox. Wait — Crimson Fox?

Always the hero, Crimson Fox bravely places herself between civilians and the deadly powers of Frostbite

Yes, on Powerless, this little-known heroine of the DCU has already crossed paths numerous times with one Emily Locke (Vanessa Hudgens) – saving her on first day of work at Wayne Security, battling Frostbite on her office building’s balcony and becoming her game-changing Fantasy Superhero League pick when she surprisingly manages to leapfrog over heroes like the Flash by saving a whole cruise ship full of people. It appears that Charm City has its very own protector (Powerless continues the fine DC tradition of creating fictional cities for their superhero stomping grounds).

It’s somehow fitting and hilarious that a show about the normal people living in an unknown city of the DCU only gets to have face time with one of its more obscure heroines. But for DC fanboys like myself, it’s also great to see a largely disregarded but still fan-favourite character finally get some mainstream exposure.

But who exactly IS Crimson Fox?

In a nutshell, she was a France-based heroine created by DC scribes in the late 80s specifically so that the newly-launched Justice League Europe would actually have a European member. She would end up becoming one of the more constant members of that era, eventually moving to Justice League America after it reformed following the folding of its International division.

But lets’s deleve a little deeper, shall we?

The Origin

Chantal D’Aramis was a research scientist who worked for a corporation called Big Time. Her main project was development of an irresistible perfume derived partially from fox musk. What she didn’t know was that the formula was also toxic, and shortly after she left Big Time to give birth to twin daughters (Vivian and Constance), she died of cancer.

Years later, Vivian and Constance learned that Moriarty, their mother’s former employer, had known all along of the toxic properties their mother’s perfume development was creating, but didn’t inform her until she had refined and perfected the product. Vowing to take him down, the girls started their own beauty brand, Revson which eventually eclipsed Big Time and ruined Moriarty. This drove him crazy with revenge and he ended up killing the twins father, Andre, and then vanished.

This motivated Vivian and Constance to seek out justice not only for themselves, but “for all honest people”, so they became Crimson Fox.

Yes, they became the Crimson Fox. Since they couldn’t very well run a business empire and fight crime as a costumed vigilante (although it seems to work for Bruce Wayne), they decided to fake Constance’s death and share Vivian’s identity. So, when one twin was running Revson as Vivian, the other was free to fight crime as Crimson Fox, and vice-versa. Vive le difference!

Crimson Fox’s time as an active Justice Leaguer coincided with the trading card boom of the 90s, leading to her appearance in a number of DC’s collectable sets

Powers

Both D’Aramis girls shared enhanced abilities that are believed to be a side effect of their mother being pregnant while working on her experiemental fox musk-based perfume. Crimson Fox had enhanced strength, agility, speed, endurance and healing ability. She could leap up to 20 feet in the air and complemented this with steel-taloned gloves that enabled her to attach to and climb most surfaces (and made a pretty good weapon on their own – as did her cowl, which she could manipulate like a whip). Crimson Fox also had a pheromone-control power that she could use to influence the actions of those near her.

Career

As previously mentioned, Crimson Fox became a member of the Justice League but kept secret the fact that they were twins. This was ultimately revealed after Vivian (as Crimson Fox) began a romance with fellow Leaguer, Metamorpho. Shortly afterward, Vivian was kidnapped by the villain Puanter and killed. Constance carried on as Crimson Fox, but there was still more tragedy to follow.

After Justice League America folded and reformed as the “big guns only” JLA, Constance attempted to reform the European branch with four other Justice League cast-offs. Unfortunately, they were infiltrated by the daughter of the supervillain The Mist who managed to decimate most of Crimson Fox’s new team, killing not only Blue Devil and  Amazing Man but Crimson Fox, herself.

But that was not the end of Crimson Fox! Years later a third Crimson Fox showed up as a member of the Global Guardians, one who insinuated that she had inherited the Revson business and apparently the abilities of Crimson Fox, too. Shortly after her first appearance, DC Comics rebooted their universe (again) and in the reshuffling since, Crimson Fox has yet to be reintroduced.

Until Powerless, that is. Now she’s back, more powerful and getting more coverage than she ever has before – which I find kinda nice after having already been killed twice.

And don’t worry, they eventually thawed her out

‘Twas The Easter Before Christmas (or: When The Teen Titans Battled Santa Claus)

So, I was recently watching Netflix and catching up on the best super hero show on television today (no, not one of the CW’s colourful quartet of DC shows…and not one of Netflix’s growing stable of gritty Marvel adventures, either). What I’m talking about is Cartoon Network’s Teen Titans Go! – the irreverent animated take on the mighty teen heroes of the DC Universe.

Anyhoo, I just stumbled across a TTGO! holiday themed show (Season 3, Episode 17) that I instantly had to add to my Classic Christmas TV Episodes short list – even though it’s actually an Easter episode. It’s titled “The TTGO! Easter Holiday Classic”, but I think a more fitting title would be “A Battle With St. Nicholas”.

And in that vein, allow me to use that classic poem, “A Visit From St. Nicholas”, as inspiration for the following episode recap. After all, ‘tis the season!

 

‘Twas the Easter before Christmas and out on Titan’s Island
Our young heroes were excited – even Raven was smilin’!

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Robin had their next mission and was ready to unmask it:
“Titans – search for eggs to fill your Easter basket!”

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The Titans ran off, but soon noticed something funny…
Not an egg was to be found – nothing was there from E. Bunny!

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Something must have happened to the Holiday Hare!
There is no way he would leave Easter baskets so bare.

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The Titans questioned some other holiday icons
From second-rate days, they were nearly bygones.

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With Cupid, the boys got nowhere fast
Since he shot them all with his arrow love-blast.

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So infatuated now with one another
They forgot all about Leprechaun – paid him no bother!

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The girls tried cop roles – Starfire, the “bad” one
And Raven watched on as she harassed George Washington.

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Tom Turkey fared worse and barely squeaked out a gobble
Before Starfire bashed his head and made his brain wobble.

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Learning nothing helpful, the Titans took pause –
“Our last hope is King Holiday – we must see Santa Claus!

So off to the North Pole and Santa’s sprawling HQ,
Teeming with elves, all with something to do.

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They sat with Santa, he of white beard and round bod
Who noted that E. Bunny had been acting quite odd.

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“But if he’s gone missing, then there’s only one thing to say:
I’ll take his place – and save Easter Day!”

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The Titans all cheered as he hopped in his sleigh
And quickly restored Easter – but in a more “Christmas Way”

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That’s when Robin suddenly realized it was no time for cheer.
This was his plan all along – Santa wants to rule the whole year!

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So they raced back up north to sneak into Santa’s Lair
Shocked, but not surprised at what they saw there.

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All the holiday mascots, locked in cells, just a-chillin’!
While Santa watched over them like an evil Bond villain!

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“Yes, I kidnapped Easter Bunny and all of the rest!
Every holiday should be MINE, because I am the BEST!”

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Then Santa armoured-up, his battle suit ready to fight.
The Titans knew they were outgunned and could use some extra might.

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So with a snap of her fingers, Raven summoned to their aid
The stalwart members of the Holiday Brigade!

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A President’s Day punch, then a brutal swift kick
Followed by a bop on the noggin from Leprechaun’s stick

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Then Robin’s grapple wrapped him ’round and around
And brought Santa crashing right down to the ground.

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The day saved (again), all was now bright and sunny
And the Titans couldn’t wait to free cute, fluffy E. Bunny.

But as they unlocked his cell, what they saw was a fright
A human/bunny hybrid laying eggs? Man, that stuff just ain’t right!

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…and a Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

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X-Men: Apocalypse and a Post-Script to the 2016 Superhero Smackdowns

xmenapocI really did not plan for posts on superhero movies to take over my blog this year, but here we are with my fourth one in a row. Ah, well – at least this won’t be dwelling too much on the hero vs hero theme, because X-Men: Apocalypse is not an all-out, hero vs hero brawl like Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Captain America: Civil War. But, it still has some significant talking points – not to mention some crazy continuity issues – so let’s get to it! (Minor spoiler-ish stuff ahead).

The Battle

So, the big bad of the movie is Apocalypse, an ancient Egyptian mutant resurrected in the 1980’s who wastes no time in setting waste to the world as we know it (and played by Oscar Isaac as if he were Marlon Brando in Island of Dr. Moreau after Boo Berry-esque makeover). According to legend, Apoc always employs a guard of four mutant-powered horsemen to stand with him, help protect him and generally wreak havoc. This time around the mutants he has chosen are Storm, Psylocke, Angel and Magneto. This sets up the big hero vs hero battle of the movie, where Apoc’s X-Horsemen face off against Xavier’s X-Men.

Except it’s not really a hero vs hero battle. In the comics, Storm, Psylocke and Angel were all well-established members of the X-Men years before Apocalypse first appeared. The movie, however, has Apoc recruiting the trio long before they’ve even heard of Professor Xavier’s School for the Gifted and Never-Aging, so there’s no real “good guys vs good guys” morality going on here. The Horsemen are the straight up bad guys, doing the bidding of an even badder guy. No moral choices hang in this battle, it just straight forward good vs evil.

That said, it still gives those familiar with the X-Men comics a superhero smackdown, because even though they’re “evil” versions of their comic counterparts, they are still Storm, Psylocke and Angel. And as such, we get some great scenes of Mohawk Storm dishing it out with Cyclops, Ninja Psylocke and Beast swiping and slicing at each other and (Arch)Angel’s metal wings of fury trying to pin down the teleporting Nightcrawler. And the fact that it isn’t a hero vs hero issue, actually works in its favour. It doesn’t have to get bogged down the heavy-handed sermonizing of BvS or deal with the weighty moral issues of Civil War, it can just give us a pure throwdown. And that’s just fine for this flick. And next to the expected Quicksilver slo-mo sequence, the final smackdown is the most enjoyable part of the movie.

FUN FACT: While it may lighter in tone than both BvS and Civil War, it definitely has the most collateral damage and massive casualties, not to mention the least fallout – than the other two films combined. I mean, Apocalypse morphs half of downtown Cairo into a big pyramid, and sooo many inhabited buildings, houses, cars and landmarks the world over get dismantled and sent skyward – the Sydney Opera House, Golden Gate Bridge – were talking tens of thousands of deaths, in addition to those who mercilessly perish at the hands of Magneto, Apocalypse and Weapon X (who was let loose by a remorseless Jean Grey – way to go Jean!).

Lampshading The Muties

Of course, being an X-Men movie, there are also some story problems – and I think it’s hilarious how the filmmakers have gone from not being able to line up the continuity of the first X-Trilogy with the current one to not even being able to line up the continuity of the films within the current trilogy…and it doesn’t seem to bother them a bit that so much stuff just doesn’t make sense. In fact, they call themselves out on almost all of it before the internet legions could have at ‘em.

First off, “lampshading” is trope where an element of a story that make shake a viewer’s willing disbelief is specifically called out by the characters in the story, as a way of saying “we get it, it doesn’t make sense, and we know it, but we’re going with it”. And X-Men Apocalypse is one of the lampshadiest movies to ever have lampshaded a lampshade. Just some examples:

  • Apocalypse takes place 20 years after X-Men First Class, yet no one in the cast seems to be 20 years older, which Professor X calls out when he sees Moira McTaggert and marvels at how she looks like she hasn’t aged a day since their first meeting.
  • Quicksilver is first seen chilling in his mom’s basement, exactly like he was a decade earlier when the X-Men first met him in Days of Future Past. He later calls this out when he mentions that he does nothing and has been living in his mom’s basement for 10 years.
  • Mystique, always a champion of not being ashamed of who you are and who would proudly display her natural blue skin whenever she could, spends a large portion of the film in her human guise (Jennifer Lawrence has gone on the record several times about despising the Mystique make-up process). Is Mystique no longer “loud and proud” about her mutant-ness? Nope, she just didn’t like all the attention she was getting for being a “hero” after the events of Days Of Future Past, so now she goes incognito as human. (So, she’s still not ashamed of who she is, she’s just trying to dodge the paparazzi, y’all)
  • The X-films have never done right by their mutants when it came to their uniforms, usually sticking them in nothing more than glorified flight suits. Apocalypse’s iteration of this is by far the blandest and most generic – but also the most acknowledged: “Hey guys, look – flight suits!” – Cyclops, stumbling across a locker in the Alkali Lake facility, which the X-Men quickly plunder.
  • When Scott, Jean, Kurt and Jubilee go see Return of the Jedi, they have a very meta talk about trilogies and how the third one always sucks (a slight dig at the less-than-loved X-Men: Last Stand, which got all but erased from X-continuity after Days of Future Past…or DID it?)
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Professor Xavier’s first class of mutants, (Top, circa 1962) are shocked to discover that none of them have aged more than 5 years over the past two decades (Bottom, circa 1983)

And then there are things that the film does not even mention, but just hang there, taunting viewers – like how Alex Summers is the X-Men’s own Benjamin Button. To wit:

1) We’ve got a 20+ year difference between siblings Alex and Scott Summers (Alex/Havok was a teen in First Class, and now, 20 years later, he has a little bro Scott/Cyclops who is just a teen himself in Apocalypse)

2) Alex should be pushing 40, but looks like he still hasn’t started shaving yet

3) Mr. and Mrs. Summers look to be in their late 40s themselves, and definitely not old enough to have a child of Alex’s supposed age.

So what gives? Well…does it even matter? The filmmakers don’t think it does, so why should we?

And therein lies part of the fun of the X-Men movies these days. In this age of superhero cinematic saturation, at least the X-Men films can stand out by being the most comic book-y of them all – complete with an implied mission statement that resonates with any comic fanboy or girl. Something like, “Give em’ some big flashy battles with the characters they wanna see, and if it doesn’t make sense, who cares – we’ll just ret-con it all later…maybe”

Captain America: Civil War Is a Super-Hero Fight Done Right

civil-war-poster3I was a little hesitant to do my third post in a row on a superhero movie, especially since I usually only post on a monthly basis, so I try to keep my topics varied. But then I thought: Well, superheroes ARE pretty much dominating pop culture right now…and this post actually will tie in the last two quite neatly so…I quickly convinced myself to go ahead with it.

And now that the dust has settled from 2016’s third (but definitely not last) superhero box office assault, Captain America: Civil War has surprised absolutely no one by dominating its debut weekend with a domestic gross of $179 million (adding to its already-impressive global tally, which Box Office Mojo reports is currently at $494 million). So now let’s take a look at the other impressive feat the movie accomplished:

Namely, where this year’s other hero vs hero spectacle (Batman v Superman) went wrong, Captain America: Civil War went right. Many times, in fact – so let’s take a closer look. (Fair warning: minor spoilers ahoy!)

The Reason for Conflict

Civil War kicks off with an Avengers mission that results in the deaths of multiple innocent bystanders. This, in addition to civilian casualties from the events in the previous Avengers films, causes the United Nations to say that super-powered individuals need to be kept in check and should not be able to act with autonomy however they please. Thus, the team has a choice: work under the United Nations and only on approved missions or hang up their costumes and retire (or otherwise face arrest). The issue not only divides Captain America and Iron Man and the rest of team, but it is also gives the viewers something to weigh the pros and cons of and see which side they would support.

The conflict of BvS however, was between two superheroes who felt each other needed to be taken down because their methods proved that they were a threat to society. The fact that they were both correct – Superman has his carelessness about collateral damage and Batman’s overly violent tactics lead to many unnecessary deaths – are lost on both of them, and as a result the audience gets no one to really root for or even an issue to side with. Both are in the wrong and it becomes just two thick-headed heroes in grudge match.

The Battle

The big face-off in Civil War is simply glorious. It’s a comic book splash page come to life as each side of heroes charge into battle on a deserted airport runaway in the bright light of day. And while it’s a serious battle, there are still light-hearted moments to be had and even more amazingly, it involves 12 heroes flying and jumping and zapping and punching yet it never feels overcrowded, each hero gets a chance to shine and the action is crisp and clear and easy to follow.

Apparently Hawkeye didn't get the memo about red being Team Cap's signature colour

Apparently Hawkeye didn’t get the memo about red being Team Cap’s signature colour

The muddled big battle of BvS just looks even worse by comparison. Dark and gloomy and set mostly inside crumbling buildings – it’s sometimes hard to pick out exactly what’s going on, even though it’s just a one-on-one battle.

Subplots and Introductions

It wouldn’t be a Marvel Cinematic Universe movie if there wasn’t a set-up for new characters and/or spin-off films, and Civil War keeps the status quo. At the risk of overcrowding a film bursting with returning characters, the filmmakers added two new ones – Black Panther and the rebooted-for-the-MCU Spider-Man – to the mix. But unlike BvS, which shoehorned in a lame side story that went nowhere and had nothing to do with main plot at all in order to tease the future Justice League members, the new debuts in Civil War are more organic and connect to the plot

Black Panther/T’Challa is royalty from Wakanda, the nation which lost a number of citizens in the tragedy depicted in the opening mission and he is present, along with Black Widow, when a bomb goes off at the UN and kills his father, the king of Wakanda. This gives him his own agenda which then crosses paths with the rest of the Avengers.  And Tony Stark, needing to beef up his ranks for the impending smack down with Cap’s own beefed-up team of supporters, heads out to Queens, NY to have a little chat with one Peter Parker – a nervous, techie teen who lives with his Aunt May (hello, Marisa Tomei!). Tony (with the help from many StarkTech surveillance gadgets) has correctly sussed out that Parker is the new spider-themed hero that has been cleaning up crime in New York. A quick recruitment drive later and Spidey is on Team Iron Man (and easily one of the best parts of the big smackdown).

All in all, it’s much more plausible and thought-out  than just having the new heroes  “show up” unannounced to join in a big fight, much to the confusion of the other players – which is exactly how Wonder Woman was brought into BvS (which was very welcome, of course – but still very clunky).

Fanboy Moments and Surprise Twists

Civil War has a number of definite, clear fanboy moments – cool shots or scenes that look fine to the average viewer but hold something more for the seasoned fan (e.g. Hawkeye + Ant-Man…’nuff said).

BvS couldn’t even make a moment out of explaining the absence of Robin by showing his defaced costume in a display case, since it wasn’t even close to recognizable as Robin’s costume in the first place.

Civil War also had an awesome surprise from Ant-Man (that was spoiled for some when it was revealed in a Lego tie-in playset, of all things) as well as a final-act twist that literally had me gasp (although, I never watch the full trailers for movies I’m going to see, so it may very well have been a twist that was already revealed).

But the big surprise in BvS is…Superman dies. And then he gets buried, but the twist is that he may not actually be dead?

Um, yeah – the dude’s in the upcoming Justice League movies and he’s also, y’know Superman…so, I can pretty much guarantee that not one person was shocked by this shocking twist.

 

Listen, I’ll always be a DC fanboy at heart, but Captain America: Civil War was just the palette cleanser that was needed after the overcooked Batman v Superman. And it somehow managed to do something pretty amazing, too – it got me actually looking forward to the next Spider-Man film (I KNOW).

 

 

Batman v Superman: Pros v Cons (Part II)

 

batmanvsuperman-headerContinuing my breakdown of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – my last post covered some of the films Pros, so this time around I’m digging into its Cons. Word of warning – my Cons contain deeper dives into the film and its specifics, so if you haven’t seen it yet…Spoilers Ahoy!

Cons

Desaturation – Director Zach Snyder has never met something bright he couldn’t suck the life out of or something pristine he couldn’t muck up with a few handfuls of dirt, and Batman v Superman is no different. It’s a film whose primary colours appear to be brown/grey/blue.

One of Man of Steel’s problem points for comic fans was how dirty and dark Superman’s costume looked. And once the first official images from BvS appeared, featuring a suited-up Henry Cavill, Ben Affleck and Gal Gadot, it was apparent that this was going to be standard practice going forward. Granted, Superman’s “S” shield in BvS is indeed brighter than the Man of Steel version, but everything else – and I mean EVERYTHING else is sucked dry of colour.

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Robin’s costume…or just a pair of greasy coveralls that Batman wears when tuning up the batmobile?

This is done to such a degree that a big Easter Egg in one scene flew right by me unnoticed, even though I was looking straight at it. The scene in question shows Bruce Wayne in the batcave as he walks by a dark costume encased in glass and defaced with a spray-painted taunt from the Joker. I just naturally assumed it was one of Batman’s old costumes (the dude has a thing for saving memorabilia, after all). It wasn’t until I saw a still of that scene a few days later when I realized, “Holy crap – that’s ROBIN’s costume!” (and that makes it a big moment for fans who know that in the comics, Batman’s second Robin, Jason Todd, was brutally killed by the Joker). But, with all of its signature red and yellow leeched out, the Robin costume was barely recognizable, unless you managed to notice the barely discernable “R” emblem (and if you weren’t too distracted with trying to read the Joker’s message).

And then as if things weren’t dark enough, we’re given a final climatic fight with three of the most dour-looking superheroes taking on a CGI monstrosity in the middle of what appears to be a maelstrom of mud, dirt and rock. Ugh.

And this look parallels the feel of the film itself. In fact, the last five major DC films (The Dark Knight TrilogyMan of Steel, BvS) have all been colourless, joyless affairs – and if this is the type of cinematic universe DC wants to create, I’m not sure if I want to be a part of it.

No

No

Lex Luthor – While some problem areas of the film are tolerable, Jesse Eisenberg’s portrayal of Superman’s arch enemy, is not. Who would ever think it would be a good idea to take the confident, arrogant and formidable evil entrepreneur that is Lex Luthor and turn him into a jittery, twitchy, incessantly rambling scientific genius with unresolved daddy issues who constantly appears to be one facial tic away from being fitted for a strait-jacket? The makers of this film, that’s who.

Bodycount Batman – If you’re making a Batman movie, the one thing you for sure do NOT want to do is make your Batman into someone who states that we should just straight-up kill someone even if we are only 1% sure that he could become an unstoppable threat – and then have that Batman soullessly and needlessly gun down, stab and kill a number of hired bad guys who are more or less just in his way. Not cool, Bat-bro, not cool.

The Title Conflict – I have a few big issues stemming from this, so let me break ‘em down for you:

1  First off, the “hero vs hero” is not only a long-standing trope in comics, but as of late, it has become one of the most overused tropes (there’s so much I can say about this, I may actually do another whole post about it). Case in point – Spring 2016 not only brings us Batman v Superman, but also Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War, featuring Team Captain America v Team Iron Man, as well as DC Entertainment’s animated release, Justice League vs Teen Titans. *Sigh* can’t everyone just get along? (Answer: Of course not, because comics).

2  Next up, this statement: For generations, comic book fans have always asked – ‘who would win in a fight, Superman or Batman?’  – which has appeared in one form or another in so many pieces about the movie. This seems to infer that the film is finally giving  the fans something they have wanted to see for decades. Well, not so much. Because you know who asks that kind of question? Kids. Little kids ask that question. Older fans don’t ask that question because they know they can find a dozen different instances where that scenario has already been played out in various comics and graphic novels over the years. And the fans also know that while they do tend to make for some good reading, ultimately, they don’t end up mattering in the big scheme of things. That’s what makes the first cinematic pairing of DC’s two most popular heroes so frustrating – because without even seeing the movie we all know that no matter the outcome of this conflict, the end result will be Bats and Supes buddying up going forward (thanks in no small part to DC’s well-publicized announcements of two upcoming Justice League films and a slate of solo spinoffs).

3  Which brings me to this point – the film’s reason behind the “hero vs hero” conflict. Generally these conflicts can make for a good comic book story because they are usually the result of one of the following scenarios:

  • two heroes/teams meeting for the first time and mistakenly think each other is the enemy
  • a hero/team is forced to turn against their comrades (eg., via mind control, or in order to ensure the safety of innocents)
  • a controversial choice is made or stand is taken that divides heroes and ultimately makes them fight for what they think is right.

But none of these hold true for Batman v Superman.

The heroes whole conflict is because Bat-Douche thinks the Son of Krypton is an irresponsible threat to civilians and Super-Smug thinks the Dark Knight is ruthless vigilante meting out his own sadistic brand of justice. They are both aware of one another, but don’t know each other – so of course, neither try to approach the other and say, “Hey dude, we both want to stop evil, but I think you should maybe check yourself a bit, y’know?” Instead, they just start right in with the fisty-punchy ka-pows and the bang-bang-zappy. (Superman does try for one brief second to reason with Batman, but then gets sucker bat-punched and goes off the rails…again).

So, the title conflict is ultimately between two heroes who have both been in the wrong with their actions – but are blind to it. They only think that it is the other who needs to be held accountable for what they’ve wrought, when in fact they both do. There’s no side to root for and no real resolution to their fight. They finally switch from bitter enemies to battle buddies after realizing that they’ve been played by Luthor and trudge off to join what really should have been the title bout of Dawn of Justice:

Wonder Woman v Doomsday!

Final Verdict – Pros v Cons: Cons

 

Batman v Superman: Pros v Cons (Part I)

BvSposterIt has been just under a week since Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice punched it’s way to a record-breaking box office debut (as of this writing, the film’s worldwide grosses have just passed the half a billion mark) and a lot of talk has been made about the reception of the film. It certainly hasn’t won over the critics, as the overall consensus has been resoundingly poor (it currently sits at 29% “fresh” on the aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes and has an average score of 44/100 over on Metacritic). There has been a lot of buzz-speak against this fact, and about how the film was “not made for the critics” but is a “film for the fans”.

But is it really? I’m a comic book fan, and while I didn’t think it was a “bad” film, I did think it was really “meh” – because even though it is mostly well-made and has its share of good moments, I found that there were a lot of problems story-wise as well as stylistically – and overall it’s definitely not the type of film I was ever hoping a Batman/Superman team-up would be. And even though the audience may have turned out in droves to support its debut, it seemed they left  mostly feeling “meh” as well (Cinemascore had viewers giving the film an overall “B” rating –  but also noting that this came partly from a  balanced amount of “A” and “C” grades given, and not simply a majority of “B” grades). It would appear then, that just as many movie-goers are enjoying the film as those who are not, while the remaining group doesn’t see much difference either way.

So, in the spirit of pitting two forces against one another, I’m going to dive a little deeper into my own views on the film and do a two-part Pros v Cons of Batman v Superman. Up first, the Pros!

Pros

Addressing the destruction in Man of Steel – By opening the film with a civilians-eye view of the destruction in Metropolis caused during Man of Steel‘s climatic fight between Superman and Zod, the film addresses head-on the biggest problem point of that film – that hundreds, if not thousands of innocent bystanders would have been killed during their battle, and no one seemed to bat an eyelash about it, most especially Superman himself. This time around we see the affect it had on those caught in the catastrophe, including one Bruce Wayne.

Wonder Woman – The long overdue big screen debut of the Amazing Amazon didn’t disappoint – the only problem being that there wasn’t enough of her, with her barely-there subplot only serving to set up future films. But still, when Gal Gadot finally suited up to join the fight against Doomsday, my face cracked the smile that had been absent from minute one of watching the film. And that smile was also due in part to…

Wonder Woman’s theme – Junkie XL collaborating on the score with Hans Zimmer seemed like an odd choice, but when Wonder Woman finally appeared, all armoured-up and backed by this jacked-up, synthesized, pulsating orchestration, it was just all kinds of right.

Batman_v_Superman_Dawn_of_Justice_WW

And just like that, the movie suddenly gets a whole lot better

Alfred – Comic book fans have known for years that Alfred is more than just a butler and surrogate father, he’s a bad-ass dude in his own right. It was refreshing to see Jeremy Irons’ portrayal of him was more as Bruce Wayne’s tech-savvy right-hand man, fully capable of tasks like drone-piloting the Batwing, than just as someone who simply buttles and tut-tuts.

The Batcave – Having the entrance to the Batcave be hidden in the middle of lake that magically parts like the Red Sea when the batmobile launches over it was the kind of stuff we needed more of – it’s a little nod to the past (in this case the 60’s Batman series with the cave entrance hidden behind a false cliffside) that’s also modern enough to give you one of those fun “oh, cool!” superhero moments that are largely lacking otherwise in the film.

The introduction of the other future Justice Leaguers – With every new hero that was announced for this film – Aquaman, Flash, Cyborg – it seemed like DC Entertainment and Warner Bros were so desperate to play catch-up to Marvel’s cinematic universe that they were going to overstuff this movie with too many points of focus. Luckily, these three heroes were all only seen briefly (apart from Flash’s cryptic cameo in the Batcave) on a few minutes of surveillance footage – with only  minimal dialogue and explanation – just a teaser of what we can expect to see of them sometime down the road.

Up next: The Cons!

DC’s Legends of Yesterday

DC Comics is enjoying its most prolific period on television ever, with no less than six prime-time television shows based on DC characters currently airing on major broadcast networks (those would be Arrow, The Flash, Gotham, Supergirl, Lucifer and of course, the company-branded, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow). But while Marvel has only just recently dominated the cinematic super hero landscape, DC has always had a strong presence on television, leaving pop culture footprints that lead all the back to the 1970s with Wonder Woman, the 1960s with Batman and even to the 1950s with The Adventures of Superman.

However, for all the iconic DC Comics-based series, there are a number lesser-known, but still worthy, series that flew under the radar. And right now I’m going to shine the spotlight on of a few them – think of them as DC’s TV Legends of Yesterday.

 

(The Adventures of) Superboy  1988-1992 (Syndication)

DCsuperboy2Well before Smallville, the live-action adventures of a young Clark Kent were brought to the small screen in Superboy (later retitled The Adventures of Superboy in its third season). Faced with the diminishing returns of their cinematic Superman/Supergirl franchise, executive producers Ilya and Alexander Salkind turned their attention to the small screen and set about launching a series based on the teen hero. However, instead of being high schoolers in Smallville, Kansas, Clark Kent and childhood sweetheart Lana Lang (played by John Haymes Newton and Stacy Haiduk) were university students in Florida (which was helped location-wise by the fact that Superboy was the first weekly series to be produced at Florida’s Disney/MGM Studios and later Universal Studios Florida)

Newton’s portrayal offered up a more confident, less-nerdy version of Clark Kent and after initial 13 episode order, the show was given the green light to produce 13 more. It was after this second batch of episodes that the producers of the show and Newton began having issues with each other (Newton’s demand for more money along with a publicized arrest for DUI didn’t help matters) and as a result, Newton was asked to leave the show.

Now, usually you would think that recasting someone who was not only the lead actor, but the title character of a show, would signal the beginning of the end – especially for a relatively new series that was trying to build an audience. But that turned out to be not the case here. The show went on to run for another three seasons, with Gerard Christopher swooping into the title role of the young Kryptonian at the start of season two, eventually appearing in a total of  74 of the 100 produced episodes.

 

 

Birds of Prey 2002-2003 (The WB)

DCbopThe now-defunct WB network had already tasted success with a female-driven action/genre series with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, so Birds of Prey seemed like a perfect fit. At the time one of DC Comics’ standout titles, the comic book Birds of Prey centered around Barbara Gordon, the former Batgirl, now crippled by the Joker and fighting crime from behind her computer screen as Oracle. To do her legwork on covert missions, she enlists the help of some of her super-powered friends, which mainly consisted of Black Canary and then later, the Huntress. This was the first thing the TV version switched up a bit – choosing to make Huntress (Ashley Scott) the main partner of Oracle (Dina Meyer) with a not-quite Black Canary, Dinah (Rachel Skarsten) joining them later.

Now, usually a big stumbling block for comics that make the transition to the small screen is conveying their premise and backstory easily to the audience so they can get onboard as quickly and painlessly as possible. And as a comic, Birds of Prey was already carrying some big baggage, especially for those people who only knew of Batgirl as the bouncy redhead from the Batman series and animated shows. So, it’s a real head-scratcher that the WB opted to take that premise and make it even MORE confusing – tweaking characters, locations, histories and well… sometimes it’s better to show than to tell, so just soak up this one very expositional voice over that introduced the show each week.

 

That said, the show was still well done and it brought in the biggest ratings for a premiere episode on the WB at the time. However, it wasn’t able to sustain those numbers, and as the show was quite expensive to produce, it wasn’t deemed profitable enough to continue beyond its initial 13 episode order. But, even though it was a bit misguided, the series is still well-remembered by many BoP fans (especially since it included Mia Sara’s role as the big bad of the series – the first live-action version of Dr. Harleen Quinzel aka Harley Quinn)

 

Legion of Super Heroes 2006-2008 (The CW)

DClsh2One of the oldest super hero teams in comic book history (they first appeared in 1958) the Legion of Super Heroes have been a fan-favourite team for decades. In 2006, following the smash successes of the animated Justice League and Teen Titans series, the futuristic team of super-teens finally got their due with their own series.

Legion of Super Heroes ran for two seasons as part of the Kids WB lineup on the newly-formed CW network. It introduced viewers to the young and vibrant team of heroes from the 31st century who take the young Superman from the 21st century under their wing to give him the training and experience he’ll need to become the legend they know him as in their era.

Legion of Super Heroes was a fun and exciting show that proved there was a way to take decades of continuity, characters and backstory and just filter it down to necessary elements that would appease fans of the comic while not alienating new audiences. And with the cues DC Entertainment has been taking from Marvel’s cinematic universe, I’m surprised that they haven’t realized that they already have their own answer to the Guardians of the Galaxy in Legion of Super Heroes…and it’s just been left sitting there, waiting for the live-action treatment. Oh well, until then we can always enjoy the rather awesome LSH opening credits and theme: